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A Real Little Boy Blue

from Boys And Girls Bookshelf - STORIES for LITTLE BOYS





BY CAROLINE S. ALLEN

Once there were four little brothers. The oldest had black eyes. He was
called Little Boy Black. But I haven't time to tell about him just now.
The second little brother had brown eyes. He was called Little Boy
Brown. But I cannot tell you about him either. The third little brother
had gray eyes, and was called Little Boy Gray. There is a very nice
story I could tell you about him, but I am sure you would rather hear
about the fourth little brother.



For the youngest little brother had blue eyes; and his father and
mother, his grandfather and grandmother, and every one else, called him
Little Boy Blue. His eyes were very blue--as blue as the flowers you
find down by the brook. You love the blue flowers, I know. And so I will
tell you about Little Boy Blue.

His jacket was blue, his trousers were blue, his stockings were blue,
and even his little shoes were blue.

One day Little Boy Blue's mother said to him: "Do you want to go and
visit Aunt Polly?" "Who is Aunt Polly?" asked Little Boy Blue. "Aunt
Polly lives on a farm, on a high hill. She has horses, and cows, and
pigs, and hens, and ducks, and geese--" "And elephants?" asked Little
Boy Blue. "No, not any elephants. But she has a woolly white lamb." "Oh,
then I will go," cried Little Boy Blue. So his mother went up-stairs and
found a little blue traveling-bag. And in the little blue bag she packed
some of Little Boy Blue's clothes. Then Little Boy Blue and his mother
went to visit Aunt Polly, who lived on a farm on a high hill.

Little Boy Blue's mother stayed two days, and Little Boy Blue stayed ten
days. When his mother was going home, she said to Aunt Polly: "Little
Boy Blue likes to play, but he likes to work, too. So be sure to give
him some work to do every day."

"Very well," said Aunt Polly. And so by-and-by Aunt Polly went to find
Little Boy Blue. And she said to him: "Dear Little Boy Blue, what can
you do to help?" He thought a minute, and then he said: "I can eat
apples to see if they are ripe. And I can pull the roses in the garden,
if you have too many."

"The apples are not ripe, and I have just enough roses in the garden,"
said Aunt Polly. "Can you drive the cows out of the corn?"

"Oh, yes, I can," said Little Boy Blue, "if Towzer can come too." Towzer
was the dog.

"And perhaps you can look after the sheep?"

"Yes, Aunt Polly, I can do that," said Little Boy Blue.

On the shelf in Little Boy Blue's room stood a little blue clock. And
every morning at five o'clock the door of the clock flew open, and a
cuckoo came out. The cuckoo said, "Cuck-oo," five times, and then went
into the little blue clock again, and the little door closed after him.
Then Little Boy Blue knew it was time to get up.

When he was dressed, he came down-stairs, and Aunt Polly gave him his
breakfast. He had new milk in a blue bowl, and johnny-cake on a little
blue plate. These he always carried out onto the door-step because he
liked, while he was eating and drinking, to see the green grass bending
in the breeze, and the yellow butterflies dancing here and there in the
sunshine.

"This is the creamiest milk I ever saw," said Little Boy Blue.

"That's nice," said Aunt Polly. "Do you want some more?"

"Yes, please," said Little Boy Blue. So Aunt Polly brought the blue
pitcher, and poured more creamy milk into his little blue bowl, and
Little Boy Blue said: "Thank you, Aunt Polly."

When Little Boy Blue could eat no more golden johnny-cake, and drink no
more creamy milk, he jumped up from the door-step.

First he put his arms around Aunt Polly's neck, and gave her a hug and a
kiss. Then he went into the house to get his horn. The horn was a little
blue one, and it hung on a peg near the kitchen door.

What do you suppose the horn was for? Why, Little Boy Blue watched the
cows and the sheep. Then if they got into the wrong places, and trampled
on the crops, Little Boy Blue blew the horn. One of the men always heard
the horn, and came to help drive the cows or the sheep back where they
belonged.

All this was very pleasant. But one day--what do you think? The sheep
ran away, and jumped over a stone wall into the meadow, and the cows got
into the corn. Nobody knew how it happened. Little Boy Blue had gone out
that morning, just as he always did, to look after them; and no one had
heard any horn. At last Towzer ran up to the barn, barking loudly. That
was to give the alarm--about the sheep and the cows.

"How queer!" said Aunt Polly, who was in the barn-yard feeding the
chickens.

"How strange!" said Uncle Ben.

"Where's Little Boy Blue?" asked the men.



"I'll call him," said Aunt Polly. So she walked, and she walked, all
around the farm. As Aunt Polly walked she looked here, and she looked
there. And she called:

"Little Boy Blue! Come blow your horn.
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn."

Where do you think Aunt Polly found him? When the head-farmer asked her,
"Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep?" Aunt Polly said:
"He's under the haycock, fast asleep."

"Shall we go wake him?" said the head-farmer.

"No, no; let him lie," said Aunt Polly. "For if we should wake him,
'he'd cry, cry, cry.'"

You see Little Boy Blue got up so early, he grew sleepy. And the sun was
hot. And the haymow made a soft pillow. So he fell sound asleep, and
dreamed about the woolly white lamb.

But on the day after that, Little Boy Blue took a nap, first, so that
when he looked after the cows and the sheep he could keep awake. He
never again had to be told to blow his horn.

When Little Boy Blue's visit was over, Aunt Polly said: "You've been a
dear little helper. I'm going to give you something to take home." And,
oh, joy! it was the woolly white lamb!





Next: Travels Of A Fox

Previous: Hans The Innocent



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