An old man and woman were married for years even though they hated each other. When they had a fight, screams and yelling could be heard deep into the night. A constant statement was heard by the neighbors who feared the man the most... "When I d... Read more of Black Magic at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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A Visitor From Paradise

from Europa's Fairy Book





There was once a woman, good but simple, who had been twice married.
One day when her husband was in the field--of course that was her
second husband, you know--a weary tramp came trudging by her door and
asked for a drink of water. When she gave it to him, being rather a
gossip, she asked where he came from.

"From Paris," said the man.

The woman was a little bit deaf, and thought the man said from
Paradise.

"From Paradise! Did you meet there my poor dear husband, Lord rest his
soul?"

"What was his name?" asked the man.

"Why, John Goody, of course," said the woman. "Did you know him in
Paradise?"

"What, John Goody!" said the man. "Him and me was as thick as
thieves."

"Does he want for anything?" said the woman. "I suppose up in Paradise
you get all you want."

"All we want! Why, look at me," said the man pointing to his rags and
tatters. "They treat some of us right shabby up there."

"Dear me, that's bad. Are you likely to go back?"

"Go back to Paradise, marm; I should say! We have to be in every night
at ten."

"Well, perhaps you wouldn't mind taking back some things for my poor
old John," said the woman.

"In course, marm, delighted to help my old chum John."

So the woman went indoors and got a big pile of clothes and a long
pipe and three bottles of beer, and a beer jug, and gave them to the
man.

"But," he said, "please marm, I can't carry all these by my own self.
Ain't you got a horse or a donkey that I can take along with me to
carry them? I'll bring them back to-morrow."

Then the woman said, "There's our old Dobbin in the stable; I can't
lend you mare Juniper cos my husband's ploughing with her just now."

"Ah, well, Dobbin'll do as its only till to-morrow."

So the woman got out Dobbin and saddled him, and the man took the
clothes and the beer and the pipe and rode off with them.

Shortly afterwards her husband came home and said,

"What's become of Dobbin? He's not in the stable."

So his wife told him all that had happened. And he said,

"I don't like that. How do we know that he is going to Paradise? And
how do we know that he'll bring Dobbin back to-morrow? I'll saddle
Juniper and get the things back. Which way did he go?"

So he saddled Juniper and rode after the man, who saw him coming afar
off and guessed what had happened. So he got off from Dobbin and drove
him into a clump of trees near the roadside, and then went and laid
down on his back and looked up to the sky.

When the farmer came up to him he got down from Juniper and said,
"What are you doing there?"

"Oh, such a funny thing," said the man; "a fellow came along here on a
horse with some clothes and things, and when he got to the top of the
hill here he simply gave a shout and the horse went right up into the
sky; and I was watching him when you came up."

"Oh, it's all right then," said the farmer. "He's gone to Paradise,
sure enough," and went back to his wife.

Next day they waited, and they waited for the man to bring back
Dobbin; but he didn't come that day nor the next day, nor the next. So
the farmer said to his wife,

"My dear, we've been done. But I'll find that man if I have to trudge
through the whole kingdom. And you must come with me, as you know
him."

"But what shall we do with the house?" said the wife. "You know there
have been robbers around here, and while we are away they'll come and
take my best chiny."

"Oh, that's all right," said the farmer. "He who minds the door minds
the house. So we'll take the door with us and then they can't get in."

So he took the door off its hinges and put it on his back and they
went along to find the man from Paradise. So they went along, and they
went along, and they went along till night came, and they didn't know
what to do for shelter. So the man said,

"That's a comfortable tree there; let us roost in the branches like
the birds." So they took the door up with them and laid down to sleep
on it as comfortable, as comfortable can be.



Now it happened that a band of robbers had just broken into a castle
near by and taken out a great lot of plunder; and they came under the
very tree to divide it. And when they began to settle how much each
should have they began to quarrel and woke up the farmer and his wife.
They were so frightened when they heard the robbers underneath them
that they tried to get up farther into the tree, and in doing so let
the door fall down right on the robbers' heads.

"The heavens are falling," cried the robbers, who were so frightened
that they all rushed away. And the farmer and his wife came down from
the tree and collected all the booty and went home and lived happy
ever afterwards.

It was and it was not.





Next: Inside Again

Previous: The Master-maid



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