VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.childrenstories.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

The Two Brothers And The Gold

from Fables For Children, Stories For Children, Natural Science Stori - WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO





In ancient times there lived not far from Jerusalem two brothers, the
elder named Athanasius, and the younger John. They lived in a mountain,
not far from the city, and supported themselves on what people offered
them. The brothers passed all their days at work. They worked not for
themselves, but for the poor. Wherever were those who were oppressed by
labour, or sick people, or orphans, or widows, thither the brothers
went, and there they worked, and received no pay. Thus the two brothers
passed the whole week away from each other, and met only on Saturday
evening in their abode. On Sunday alone did they stay at home, and then
they prayed and talked with each other. And an angel of the Lord came
down to them and blessed them. On Monday they separated each in his own
direction. Thus they lived for many years, and each week the angel of
the Lord came down to them and blessed them.

One Monday, when the brothers had already gone out to work and had gone
each in his direction, the elder brother, Athanasius, was loath to part
from his brother, and he stopped and looked back. John was walking with
lowered head, in his direction, without looking back. But suddenly John,
too, stopped and, as though he had suddenly noticed something, gazed at
something, while shielding his eyes. Then he approached what he was
gazing at, suddenly jumped to one side, and, without looking back, ran
down-hill and up-hill again, away from the place, as though a wolf were
after him. Athanasius was surprised. He went back to that spot, to see
what it was that had so frightened his brother. He went up to it and
saw something shining in the sun. He came nearer, and there lay a heap
of gold on the ground, as though poured out from a measure. And
Athanasius was still more surprised, both at the gold and at his
brother's leap.

"Why was he frightened, and why did he run away?" thought Athanasius.
"There is no sin in gold. The sin is in man. With gold one may do wrong,
but also some good. How many orphans and widows may be fed, how many
naked people dressed, and the poor and sick aided with this gold! We now
serve people, but our service is small, though it is to the best of our
strength. With this gold, however, we can serve people better."

Thus Athanasius thought, and he wanted to tell it all to his brother;
but John was out of the range of hearing, and could be seen only as a
speck the size of a beetle on another mountain.

Athanasius took off his cloak, scooped up as much gold as he was able to
carry away, threw it on his shoulder, and carried it into the city. He
came to a hostelry and left the gold with the keeper, and went back for
the rest. When he had brought all the gold, he went to the merchants,
bought some land in the city, and stones and timber, and hired
labourers, and began to build three houses.

Athanasius lived for three months in the city, and built three houses
there: one--an asylum for widows and orphans, another--a hospital for
the sick and the lame, and a third--for pilgrims and for the needy. And
Athanasius found three God-fearing old men, and one of them he placed in
charge of the asylum, the second--of the hospital, and the third--of the
hostelry. And Athanasius had still three thousand gold coins left. He
gave each old man one thousand coins to distribute them to the poor.

The three houses began to fill up with people, and the people began to
praise Athanasius for everything he had done. And Athanasius was glad of
that and did not feel like leaving the city. But he loved his brother
and so he bade the people farewell and, without keeping a single coin,
went back to his abode, wearing the same old garment in which he had
come.

As Athanasius was approaching his mountain, he thought:

"My brother did not judge rightly when he jumped from the gold and ran
away from it. Have I not done better?"

And no sooner had Athanasius thought so than he saw the angel who used
to bless him standing in the road and looking threateningly at him. And
Athanasius was frightened and only said:

"For what, O Lord?"

And the angel opened his lips, and said:

"Go hence! You are not worthy of living with your brother. One leap of
your brother is worth all the deeds which you have done with your gold."

And Athanasius began to speak of how many poor people and pilgrims he
had fed, and how many orphans he had housed. And the angel said:

"The devil who placed the gold there has also taught you these words."

Then only did his conscience trouble him, and he saw that he had done
his deeds not for God, and he wept and began to repent.

The angel stepped out of the road and opened the path on which his
brother, John, was already standing and waiting for him. After that
Athanasius no longer submitted to the temptation of the devil who had
scattered the gold, and he understood that not with gold, but only with
words can we serve God and men.

And the brothers began to live as before.




Next: Ilyas

Previous: Little Girls Wiser Than Old People



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1602