Baseball Game.ca - Baseball News and Scores. Baseball history and baseball basics. Visit Baseball Game.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

TOMMY CHASES MR. WOODCHUCK

from The Tale Of Tommy Fox





Tommy Fox went up into Farmer Green's back-pasture, which, lay even
nearer Blue Mountain than the field where Tommy and his mother lived.
He skulked along among the rocky hummocks, and the old stumps which
dotted the pasture thickly. His ears and his eyes and his nose were
all alert to discover any small animal that might be stirring--
especially his nose; for Tommy could smell things when they were a
long way off.

Tommy's mother had explained to him that he must always hunt with the
wind blowing in his face; because then the breeze brought to him the
scent of any animal that might be in front of him, whether it happened
to be an animal that Tommy was hunting, or some animal that was
hunting _him_. In that way Tommy would be able to know what was ahead
of him, even if he couldn't see it.



But if he were careless, and trotted along with the wind blowing
_behind him_--ah! that was quite different. The other forest-people
would all know he was coming, for then _they_ would be able to get
Tommy's scent. And some day, if he were so foolish as to go about with
the wind at his back, some day he might stumble right onto a wildcat,
or a dog, or a man, or some other terrible creature.

Well--Tommy remembered all these things that his mother had told him.
The wind blew fresh in his face. And to his delight all at once he
smelled a woodchuck. There was no mistaking that savoury smell. It
affected Tommy very pleasantly--much as you are affected by catching a
whiff of hot peanuts, or pop-corn, or candy cooking on the stove.

Tommy stole along very carefully. And as he peered around a stump he
saw, not ten jumps ahead of him, a fine, fat woodchuck. Tommy crept up
a little closer; and then he sprang for Mr. Woodchuck with a rush.

Pudgy Mr. Woodchuck saw Tommy just in time. He turned tail and ran for
his life; and he was so spry, though he was quite a fat, elderly
gentleman, that he reached his hole and whisked down out of sight just
as Tommy was about to seize him.

Tommy was disappointed. But he was determined to get that woodchuck,
and he began to dig away at Mr. Woodchuck's hole. You see, Mr.
Woodchuck was smaller than Tommy Fox, and since the underground tunnel
that led to his home was only big enough to admit _him_, Tommy was
obliged to make it larger. Though Mr. Woodchuck's hole was under a
shady oak tree, Tommy found digging to be somewhat warm work, so he
took off his neat, red coat and hung it carefully upon a bush.

He worked very hard, for he was eager to find Mr. Woodchuck. In fact,
the further Tommy dug into the ground the more excited he grew. And he
had just decided that he had almost reached the end of the tunnel, and
that a little more digging would bring him inside of Mr. Woodchuck's
house, when he met with an unexpected check.

To Tommy's dismay, Mr. Woodchuck's tunnel led between two roots of the
big oak, and Tommy could not squeeze between them. He reached his paws
through the narrow opening and crowded his nose in as far as it would
go. But that was all he could do. He did not doubt that somewhere in
beyond, in the darkness, Mr. Woodchuck was having a good laugh because
Tommy had done all that work for nothing.

I am sorry to say that Tommy Fox lost his temper. He called after Mr.
Woodchuck. Yes--he shouted some rather bad names after him. But of
course that didn't do a bit of good. And Tommy Fox put on his coat and
went home to think about what he could do. He didn't care to ask his
mother's advice, because he didn't want her to know that Mr. Woodchuck
had got away from him. But he hoped to find some way in which he could
catch the old gentleman.





Next: SOMETHING MAKES TOMMY VERY PROUD

Previous: MR. GRAY SQUIRREL'S MISTAKE



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1762