Mississippi Federal Writers Slave Autobiographies Smith Hodges, Ex-Slave, Pike County FEC Mrs. W.F. Holmes [FANNY SMITH HODGES Berglundtown, Mississippi] Fanny Smith Hodges lives in Berglundtown, in the northern part of town, in the ... Read more of Fanny Smith Hodges at Martin Luther King.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

The Toy-goose

from Stories To Read Or Tell From Fairy Tales And Folklore





A Flea, a Grasshopper, and a Toy-goose once wanted to see which of them
could jump highest, and so they invited the whole world and everybody else
who would like to come, to see the frolic. When the three met together in
the room, everyone thought they were remarkable jumpers.

"Well, I'll give my daughter to the one who jumps highest!" said the king;
"for it would not be fair to let these people jump for nothing!"

The first one to step forward was the Flea; he had such perfect manners and
bowed on every side, for he had noble blood in his veins, and more than
that, he associated only with human beings, which makes a great difference.

Then came the Grasshopper; he was certainly very much larger, however, he
carried himself well, and wore the green uniform he was born with.
Moreover, as he said, he belonged to a very old family in the land of
Egypt, and was well thought of here at home.

The fact was, when he was brought out of the fields he was put in a house,
three storeys high, all made of court-cards with the colored side turned
in; both doors and windows were cut out in the waist of the Queen of
Hearts. "I sing so well," he said "that sixteen native crickets who had
chirped since they were born, and still had no house of cards to live in,
grew thinner than they were before out of vexation when they heard of me."

So it was that the Flea and the Grasshopper were able to give a good
account of themselves, and saw no reason why they should not marry the
princess.

The Toy-goose said nothing; and people thought it was because he knew all
the more; the house-dog sniffed at him with his nose, and assured them the
Toy-goose was of good family. The old councilor, who had three orders given
him for holding his tongue, said that the Toy-goose was a prophet; for one
could see on his back if there would be a severe or mild winter, and that
was more than one could see on the back of the man who writes the
almanacs.



"Well, I shall say nothing," said the king, "however I have my own
opinion."

The trial was to take place at once, so the Flea jumped first. He jumped so
high that nobody could see where he went to; so they said he had not jumped
at all; which was shameful.

The Grasshopper jumped only half as high; but he jumped right into the
king's face, which, the king said was most unpleasant.

The Toy-goose stood still for a long time, thinking to himself; at last the
people believed he would not jump at all.

"I only hope he is not ill," said the house-dog; when, pop! he made a side
jump right into the lap of the princess, who was sitting on a little golden
stool close by.

Then the king said, "There is nothing above my daughter; therefore he has
made the highest jump that can be made: to do this, one must have a good
mind and the Toy-goose has shown that he has a good mind. He has a mind of
his own!"

And so he won the princess.

"It's all the same to me, she may have the old Toy-goose, for all I care,"
said the Flea. "I jumped the highest; but, in this world a fine appearance
is what people look at nowadays."

The Flea then went into a foreign land and enlisted, where it is said, he
was killed.

The Grasshopper sat on a green bank, and thought on worldly things; and he
said, "Yes, a fine appearance is everything--a fine appearance is what
people care about." And then he began chirping his melancholy song from
which we have taken this story; and which may or may not be true, although
it is printed.





Next: Yellow Lily

Previous: King Longbeard



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1161