Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

The Stone-cutter

from Stories To Read Or Tell From Fairy Tales And Folklore





Once upon a time there lived a stone-cutter, who went every day to a great
rock in the side of a big mountain and cut out slabs for gravestones or for
houses. He understood very well the kinds of stones wanted for the
different purposes, and as he was a careful workman he had plenty of
customers. For a long time he was quite happy and contented, and asked for
nothing better than what he had.

Now in the mountain dwelt a spirit which now and then appeared to men, and
helped them in many ways to become rich and prosperous. The stone-cutter,
however, had never seen this spirit, and only shook his head, with an
unbelieving air, when anyone spoke of it. But a time was coming when he
learned to change his opinion.

One day the stone-cutter carried a gravestone to the house of a rich man,
and saw there all sorts of beautiful things, of which he had never even
dreamed. Suddenly his daily work seemed to grow harder and heavier, and he
said to himself: "Oh, if only I were a rich man, and could sleep in a bed
with silken curtains and golden tassels, how happy I should be!"


And a voice answered him: "Your wish is heard; a rich man you shall be!"

At the sound of the voice the stone-cutter looked round, but could see
nobody. He thought it was all his fancy, and picked up his tools and went
home, for he did not feel inclined to do any more work that day. But when
he reached the little house where he lived, he stood still with amazement,
for instead of his wooden hut was a stately palace filled with splendid
furniture, and most splendid of all was the bed, in every respect like the
one he had envied. He was nearly beside himself with joy, and in his new
life the old one was soon forgotten.

It was now the beginning of summer, and each day the sun blazed more
fiercely. One morning the heat was so great that the stone-cutter could
scarcely breathe, and he determined he would stop at home till the
evening. He was rather dull, for he had never learned how to amuse himself,
and was peeping through the closed blinds to see what was going on in the
street, when a little carriage passed by, drawn by servants dressed in blue
and silver. In the carriage sat a prince, and over his head a golden
umbrella was held, to protect him from the sun's rays.

"Oh, if I were only a prince!" said the stone-cutter to himself, as the
carriage vanished round the corner. "Oh, if I were only a prince, and could
go in such a carriage and have a golden umbrella held over me, how happy I
should be!"

And the voice of the mountain spirit answered: "Your wish is heard; a
prince you shall be."

And a prince he was. Before his carriage rode one company of men and
another behind it; servants dressed in scarlet and gold bore him along, the
coveted umbrella was held over his head, everything heart could desire was
his. But yet it was not enough. He looked round still for something to
wish for, and when he saw that in spite of the water he poured on his
grass the rays of the sun scorched it, and that in spite of the umbrella
held over his head each day his face grew browner and browner, he cried in
his anger: "The sun is mightier than I; oh, if I were only the sun!"

And the mountain spirit answered: "Your wish is heard; the sun you shall
be."

And the sun he was, and felt himself proud in his power. He shot his beams
above and below, on earth and in heaven; he burnt up the grass in the
fields and scorched the faces of princes as well as of poorer folk. But in
a short time he began to grow tired of his might, for there seemed nothing
left for him to do. Discontent once more filled his soul, and when a cloud
covered his face, and hid the earth from him he cried in his anger: "Does
the cloud hold captive my rays, and is it mightier than I? Oh, that I were
a cloud, and mightier than any!"

And the mountain spirit answered: "Your wish is heard; a cloud you shall
be!"

And a cloud he was, and lay between the sun and the earth. He caught the
sun's beams and held them, and to his joy the earth grew green again and
flowers blossomed. But that was not enough for him, and for days and weeks
he poured forth rain till the rivers overflowed their banks and the crops
of rice stood in water. Towns and villages were destroyed by the power of
the rain, only the great rock on the mountain side remained unmoved. The
cloud was amazed at the sight, and cried in wonder: "Is the rock, then,
mightier than I? Oh, if I were only the rock!"

And the mountain spirit answered: "Your wish is heard; the rock you shall
be!"

And the rock he was, and glorified in his power. Proudly he stood, and
neither the heat of the sun nor the force of the rain could move him. "This
is better than all!" he said to himself. But one day he heard a strange

noise at his feet, and when he looked down to see what it could be, he saw
a stone-cutter driving tools into his surface. Even while he looked a
trembling feeling ran all through him, and a great block broke off and fell
upon the ground. Then he cried in his wrath: "Is a mere child of earth
mightier than a rock? Oh, if I were only a man!"

And the mountain spirit answered: "Your wish is heard. A man once more you
shall be!"

And a man he was, and in the sweat of his brow he toiled again at his trade
of stone-cutting. His bed was hard and his food scanty, but he had learned
to be satisfied with it, and did not long to be something or somebody else.
And as he never asked for things he had not got, or desired to be greater
and mightier than other people, he was happy at last, and heard the voice
of the mountain spirit no longer.





Next: Prince Kindhearted

Previous: The Wonders Of The World



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1322