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The Old Hag's Long Leather Bag

from Stories To Read Or Tell From Fairy Tales And Folklore





Once on a time, long, long ago, there was a widow woman who had three
daughters. When their father died, their mother thought they never would
want, for he had left her a long leather bag filled with gold and silver.
But he was not long dead, when an old hag came begging to the house one day
and stole the long leather bag filled with gold and silver, and went away
out of the country with it, no one knew where.

So from that day, the widow woman and her three daughters were poor, and
she had a hard struggle to live and to bring up her three daughters.

But when they were grown up, the eldest said one day: "Mother, I'm a young
woman now, and it's a shame for me to be here doing nothing to help you or
myself. Bake me a bannock and cut me a callop, till I go away to push my
fortune."

The mother baked her a whole bannock, and asked her if she would have half
of it with her blessing or the whole of it without. She said to give her
the whole bannock without.

So she took it and went away. She told them if she was not back in a year
and a day from that, then they would know she was doing well, and making
her fortune.

She traveled away and away before her, far further than I could tell you,
and twice as far as you could tell me, until she came into a strange
country, and going up to a little house, she found an old hag living in it.
The hag asked her where she was going. She said she was going to push her
fortune.

Said the hag: "How would you like to stay here with me, for I want a maid?"

"What will I have to do?" said she.

"You will have to wash me and dress me, and sweep the hearth clean; but on
the peril of your life, never look up the chimney," said the hag.

"All right," she agreed to this.

The next day, when the hag arose, she washed her and dressed her, and when
the hag went out, she swept the hearth clean, and she thought it would be
no harm to have one wee look up the chimney. And there what did she see but
her own mother's long leather bag of gold and silver? So she took it down
at once, and getting it on her back, started for home as fast as she could
run.

But she had not gone far when she met a horse grazing in a field, and when
he saw her, he said: "Rub me! Rub me! for I haven't been rubbed these seven
years."

But she only struck him with a stick she had in her hand, and drove him out
of her way.

She had not gone much further when she met a sheep, who said "O, shear me!
Shear me! for I haven't been shorn these seven years."

But she struck the sheep, and sent it scurrying out of her way.

She had not gone much further when she met a goat tethered, and he said:
"O, change my tether! Change my tether! for it hasn't been changed these
seven years."

But she flung a stone at him, and went on.

Next she came to a lime-kiln, and it said: "O, clean me! Clean me! for I
haven't been cleaned these seven years."

But she only scowled at it, and hurried on.

After another bit she met a cow, and it said:

"O, milk me! Milk me! for I haven't been milked these seven years."

She struck the cow out of her way, and went on.

Then she came to a mill. The mill said: "O, turn me! Turn me! for I haven't
been turned these seven years."

But she did not heed what it said, only went in and lay down behind the
mill door, with the bag under her head, for it was then night.

When the hag came into her hut again and found the girl gone, she ran to
the chimney and looked up to see if she had carried off the bag. She got
into a great rage, and she started to run as fast as she could after her.

She had not gone far when she met the horse, and she said: "O, horse, horse
of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my
long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I was a
maid?"

"Ay," said the horse, "it is not long since she passed here."

So on she ran, and it was not long till she met the sheep, and said she:
"Sheep, sheep of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my
tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the sheep, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the goat, and said she:
"Goat, goat of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my
tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the goat, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the lime-kiln, and said
she: "Lime-kiln, lime-kiln of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my
tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag, and with all the gold and
silver I have earned since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the lime-kiln, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the cow, and said she,
"Cow, cow of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag,
with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I
was a maid?"

"Ay," said the cow, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the mill, and said she:
"Mill, mill of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my
tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

And the mill said: "Yes, she is sleeping behind the door."

She went in and struck her with a white rod, and turned her into a stone.
She then took the bag of gold and silver on her back, and went away back
home.

A year and a day had gone by after the eldest daughter left home, and when
they found she had not returned, the second daughter got up, and said: "My
sister must be doing well and making her fortune, and isn't it a shame for
me to be sitting here doing nothing, either to help you, mother, or myself.
Bake me a bannock," said she, "and cut me a callop, till I go away to push
my fortune."

The mother did this, and asked her would she have half the bannock with her
blessing or the whole bannock without.

She said the whole bannock without, and she set off. Then she said: "If I
am not back here in a year and a day, you may be sure that I am doing well
and making my fortune," and then she went away.

She traveled away and away on before her, far further than I could tell
you, and twice as far as you could tell me, until she came into a strange
country, and going up to a little house, she found an old Hag living in it.
The old Hag asked her where she was going. She said she was going to push
her fortune.

Said the hag: "How would you like to stay here with me, for I want a maid?"

"What will I have to do?" says she.

"You'll have to wash me and dress me, and sweep the hearth clean; and on
the peril of your life never look up the chimney," said the hag.

"All right," she agreed to this.

The next day, when the hag arose, she washed her and dressed her, and when
the hag went out she swept the hearth, and she thought it would be no harm
to have one wee look up the chimney. And there what did she see but her own
mother's long leather bag of gold and silver? So she took it down at once,
and getting it on her back, started away for home as fast as she could run.

But she had not gone far when she met a horse grazing in a field, and when
he saw her, he said: "Rub me! Rub me! for I haven't been rubbed these seven
years."

But she only struck him with a stick she had in her hand, and drove him out
of her way.

She had not gone much further when she met the sheep, who said: "O, shear
me! Shear me! for I haven't been shorn in seven years."

But she struck the sheep, and sent it scurrying out of her way.

She had not gone much further when she met the goat tethered, and he said:
"O, change my tether! Change my tether! for it hasn't been changed in seven
years."

But she flung a stone at him, and went on.

Next she came to the lime-kiln, and that said: "O, clean me! Clean me! for
I haven't been cleaned these seven years."

But she only scowled at it, and hurried on.

Then she came to the cow, and it said: "O, milk me! Milk me! for I haven't
been milked these seven years."

She struck the cow out of her way, and went on.

Then she came to the mill. The mill said: "O, turn me! Turn me! for I
haven't been turned these seven years."

But she did not heed what it said, only went in and lay down behind the
mill door, with the bag under her head, for it was then night.

When the hag came into her hut again and found the girl gone, she ran to
the chimney and looked up to see if she had carried off the bag. She got
into a great rage, and she started to run as fast as she could after her.

She had not gone far when she met the horse, and she said: "O, horse, horse
of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my
long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I was a
maid?"

"Ay," said the horse, "it is not long since she passed here."

So on she ran, and it was not long until she met the sheep, and said she:
"Oh, sheep, sheep of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with
my tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the sheep, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the goat, and said:
"Goat, goat of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my
tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the goat, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the lime-kiln, and said
she: "Lime-kiln, lime-kiln of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my
tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I
have earned since I was a maid?"

"Ay," said the lime-kiln, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the cow, and says she:
"Cow, cow of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag,
with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I
was a maid?"

"Ay," said the cow, "it is not long since she passed here."

So she goes on, and it was not long before she met the mill, and said she:
"Mill, mill of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my
tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned
since I was a maid?"

And the mill said: "Yes, she is sleeping behind the door."



She went in and struck her with a white rod, and turned her into a stone.
She then took the bag of gold and silver on her back and went home.

When the second daughter had been gone a year and a day and she hadn't come
back, the youngest daughter said: "My two sisters must be doing very well
indeed, and making great fortunes when they are not coming back, and it's a
shame for me to be sitting here doing nothing, either to help you, mother,
or myself. Make me a bannock and cut me a callop, till I go away and push
my fortune."

The mother did this and asked her would she have half of the bannock with
her blessing or the whole bannock without.

She said: "I will have half of the bannock with your blessing, mother."

The mother gave her a blessing and half a bannock, and she set out.

She traveled away and away on before her, far further than I could tell
you, and twice as far as you could tell me, until she came into a strange
country, and going up to a little house, she found an old hag living in
it. The hag asked her where she was going. She said she was going to push
her fortune.

Said the hag: "How would you like to stay here with me, for I want a maid?"

"What will I have to do?" said she.

"You'll have to wash me and dress me, and sweep the hearth clean; and on
the peril of your life never look up the chimney," said the hag.

"All right," she agreed to this.

The next day when the hag arose, she washed her and dressed her, and when
the hag went out she swept the hearth, and she thought it would be no harm
to have one wee look up the chimney, and there what did she see but her own
mother's long leather bag of gold and silver? So she took it down at once,
and getting it on her back, started away for home as fast as she could run.

When she got to the horse, the horse said: "Rub me! Rub me! for I haven't
been rubbed these seven years."

"Oh, poor horse, poor horse," she said, "I'll surely do that." And she laid
down her bag, and rubbed the horse.

Then she went on, and it wasn't long before she met the sheep, who said:
"Oh, shear me, shear me! for I haven't been shorn these seven years."

"O, poor sheep, poor sheep," she said, "I'll surely do that," and she laid
down the bag, and sheared the sheep.

On she went till she met the goat, who said: "O, change my tether! Change
my tether! for it hasn't been changed these seven years."

"O, poor goat, poor goat," she said, "I'll surely do that," and she laid
down the bag, and changed the goat's tether.

Then she went on till she met the lime-kiln. The lime-kiln said: "O, clean
me! clean me! for I haven't been cleaned these seven years."

"O, poor lime-kiln, poor lime-kiln," she said, "I'll surely do that," and
she laid down the bag and cleaned the lime-kiln.

Then she went on and met the cow. The cow said: "O, milk me! Milk me! for I

haven't been milked these seven years."

"O, poor cow, poor cow," she said, "I'll surely do that," and she laid
down the bag and milked the cow.

At last she reached the mill. The mill said: "O, turn me! turn me! for I
haven't been turned these seven years."

"O, poor mill, poor mill," she said, "I'll surely do that," and she turned
the mill too.

As night was on her, she went in and lay down behind the mill door to
sleep.

When the hag came into her hut again and found the girl gone, she ran to
the chimney to see if she had carried off the bag. She got into a great
rage, and started to run as fast as she could after her.

She had not gone far until she came up to the horse and said: "O, horse,
horse of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag,
with my long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I
was a maid?"

The horse said: "Do you think I have nothing to do only watch your maids
for you? You may go somewhere else and look for information."

Then she came upon the sheep. "O, sheep, sheep of mine, have you seen this
maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag, and all
the gold and silver I have earned since I was a maid?"

The sheep said: "Do you think I have nothing to do only watch your maids
for you? You may go somewhere else and look for information."

Then she went on till she met the goat. "O, goat, goat of mine, have you
seen this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag,
and all the gold and silver I have earned since I was a maid?"

The goat said: "Do you think I have nothing to do only watch your maids for
you? You can go somewhere else and look for information."

Then she went on till she came to the lime-kiln. "O, lime-kiln, lime-kiln
of mine, did you see this maid of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my
long leather bag, and all the gold and silver I have earned since I was a
maid?"

Said the lime-kiln: "Do you think I have nothing to do only watch your
maids for you? You may go somewhere else and look for information."

Next she met the cow. "O, cow, cow of mine, have you seen this maid of
mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag, and all the gold
and silver I have earned since I was a maid?"

The cow said: "Do you think I have nothing to do only watch your maids for
you? You may go somewhere else and look for information."

Then she got to the mill. "O, mill, mill of mine, have you seen this maid
of mine, with my tig, with my tag, with my long leather bag, and all the
gold and silver I have earned since I was a maid?"

The mill said: "Come nearer and whisper to me."

She went nearer to whisper to the mill, and the mill dragged her under the
wheels and ground her up.

The old hag had dropped the white rod out of her hand, and the mill told
the young girl to take this white rod and strike two stones behind the mill
door. She did that, and her two sisters stood up. She hoisted the leather
bag on her back, and the three of them set out and traveled away and away
till they reached home.

The mother had been crying all the time while they were away, and was now
ever so glad to see them, and rich and happy they all lived ever after.





Next: The Wolf And The Seven Little Goats

Previous: It Is Quite True!



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