Here is a little puzzle with the simplest possible conditions. Place the point of your pencil on a letter in one of the cells of the honeycomb, and trace out a very familiar proverb by passing always from a cell to one that is contiguous to it. If yo... Read more of THE HONEYCOMB PUZZLE. at Math Puzzle.caInformational Site Network Informational
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The Little China Shepherdess

from Sandman's Goodnight Stories





On the parlor mantel of a farmhouse stood little China Shepherdess. In
one hand she held a gilt crook and with the other she shaded her eyes
and gazed far away. Probably she was looking for her sheep. Her dress
was of red and green, and it was trimmed with gilt. Her boots were
also gilt.

On the other end of the mantel stood a little china Flute Player. He
was dressed in red and white, and his flute was gilt and his boots were
red. He held his flute to his lips in a very jaunty manner, but his
eyes were on the little Shepherdess. He had been in love with her for
a long time, but never a look did she give him.

China Cat stood near the Flute Player, and one day she heard him sigh.

"Why do you sigh?" she asked him. He shook his head, but did not
answer. "I know," said the Cat; "you are in love with the Shepherdess,
and she will not look at you. Now, let me tell you how to manage.
First, you must stop looking at her. She knows that you are always
gazing in her direction."

The Flute Player shook his head again and said, "I cannot help looking
at her, she is so pretty and I love her so dearly."

"But you must," said China Cat. "There is the Flower Girl on the
center table. Look at her and play your jolliest tune and see what
happens."

So the little Flute Player took China Cat's advice and began to play a
lively air. He smiled at the little Flower Girl, who smiled in return
and made him a curtsey. Then she began to dance, keeping time to his
music. The Flute Player commenced to dance as he played, and China Cat
moved her head from side to side. The little Shepherdess tapped on the
mantel with her gilt boot and looked toward the Flute Player. But he
was gazing at the Flower Girl, and for the first time she thought him
rather good to look at.

"I cannot see what there is about that Flower Girl to attract him,"
said the Shepherdess; "she hasn't a bit of color about her; she is as
white as a piece of cloth; even her flowers are white."

By and by the little Shepherdess began to dance and she moved toward
the end of the mantel where the Flute Player stood. China Cat rubbed
against the Flute Player's leg.

"Look," she said, "but be careful she does not catch you; the
Shepherdess is coming this way."

His heart beat very fast, but he kept on playing and fixed his eyes on
the little Flower Girl. But the Shepherdess did not come any nearer
than the middle of the mantel, and not once did she look at him. By
and by it was dark and the Flute Player could not see the Flower Girl,
so he stopped playing and his heart was heavy again.

China Cat, however, was bound to make a match between the Shepherdess
and the Flute Player, and she walked over to the little Shepherdess and
asked, "Don't you think that he plays well?"

"Who?" asked the artful little Shepherdess.

"The handsome Flute Player," said China Cat.

"Oh, I have not thought much about it," answered the Shepherdess.

"Wouldn't you like to hear him play again?" said China Cat. "It would
cheer us up, the room is so dark."

Just then the moonlight streamed in the window and lighted the room.
The little Shepherdess looked into the distance again and said she
thought it would be nice to hear the music. So China Cat trotted over
to the Flute Player.

"She wants to hear you play," she said, "and I think you can win her."

The Flute Player began playing soft music and walking toward the little
Shepherdess. The music was so sweet and sad that by the time he
reached her side she was wiping her eyes. He stole one arm around her
waist and told her not to cry, that he would play a jolly tune for her.

"No, those are the tunes you play for the Flower Girl," she said,
hanging her head. "I do not want you to play them for me."

"I did not play any tunes for the Flower Girl," he said, "they were all
for you."

"But you looked at her all the time," said the now humble little
Shepherdess.

"I was thinking of you," he replied. "Let us sit on the end of the
mantel and I will play to you. What would you like to hear?"

"Play something sad," said the little Shepherdess, for, like all girls,
she wanted to cry when she was happiest.

"There," said the Cat, curling herself up for a nap, "I am glad that is
settled. She never would have given in if he had not looked at the
Flower Girl. These girls are queer creatures," she said, closing her
eyes.





Next: How The Buttercup Grew Yellow

Previous: The Revenge Of The Gnomes



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