431. If you take a baby in your arms for the first time, and at the same time wish, you will get your wish before the year is out. Quebec. 432. Take your Bible and wish. If it opens at and it came to pass, you will get your wish... Read more of Wishes at Superstitions.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

The Golden Temple

from Deccan Nursery Tales





Once upon a time there was a town called Atpat. In it there reigned a
king who had four daughters-in-law. He loved three of them very dearly,
but the fourth, who was an ugly little girl, he did not like at all. To
the three daughters-in-law he gave nice food and fine clothes. But
to the ugly little daughter-in-law he gave nothing but scraps from
his table and thick, coarse clothes to wear. He would not even let her
sleep inside the house, but made her sleep in the stable and look after
the cows. The poor ugly daughter-in-law grew so unhappy that, when the
first Monday in Shravan [26] came, she ran out of the palace, and out
of the town, and then away as fast as her fat little legs would carry
her. At last she went and hid herself in the woods. Now it so happened
that that very day a band of serpent-maidens [27] had come up from
Patala. After wandering through the forest and bathing in the running
streams, they had joined a bevy of wood-nymphs and were coming in her
direction. At first she was too terrified to say a single word. But at
last she asked, "Ladies, ladies, where are you going?" "To the temple
of Shiva," they replied, "to worship the god. For by doing that, one
wins the love of one's husband, one obtains children, and one comes by
the wish of one's heart." When the ugly daughter-in-law heard that by
doing what the serpent-maidens and the wood-nymphs were about to do
she could win love for herself, she at once thought that in this way
she, too, might win the love of her father-in-law. So she told the
serpent-maidens of Patala and the wood-nymphs that she would go with
them. They went deeper and deeper into the forest until at last they
came to a temple of the god Shiva. There the serpent-maidens and the
wood-nymphs offered to the god rice, betel-nut, incense, flowers, and
the leaves of the bel tree. The ugly little daughter-in-law did just
as they did. And when she had finished she cried out, "O God Shiva,
please, please vouchsafe my prayer also, and make my father-in-law
and my mother-in-law, my brothers-in-law and my sisters-in-law like
me as much as they now dislike me." That evening she went home and
fasted, and all the scraps which they threw to her from the king's
table she gave to her favourite cow. And then she sat by herself and
prayed to the god Shiva. The following Monday she once more ran out of
the palace and out of the town and into the woods as fast as her fat
little legs would carry her. There she met again the serpent-maidens
of Patala and the bevy of wood-nymphs and went with them to the
temple of Shiva in the distant heart of the forest. The first time the
serpent-maidens and the wood-nymphs had given her the incense and the
flowers, the rice and the betel-nut, and the leaves of the bel tree,
with which to perform her worship. But they had told her that the
next time she must bring them herself. So when she ran away on the
second Monday in Shravan she brought with her incense and flowers,
rice and betel-nut and bel-tree leaves, and after offering them and
some sesamums to the god she once more prayed, "O God Shiva, please,
please grant my prayer and make my father-in-law and my mother-in-law,
my brothers-in-law and my sisters-in-law like me as much as they now
dislike me." Then she went home and fasted, and giving all her dinner
to her favourite cow she sat by herself and prayed to Shiva. That
evening the king asked her who the god was whom she was honouring,
and where he lived. The ugly little daughter-in-law replied, "Afar
off my god lives, and the roads to him are hard, and the paths to him
are full of thorns. Where snakes abound and where tigers lie in wait,
there is his temple." The third Monday in Shravan, the ugly little
daughter-in-law again started from the palace with her flowers and
incense, her betel-nut and bel leaves, her rice and sesamum, in order
to meet the serpent-maidens of Patala and the bevy of wood-nymphs, and
with them to worship the god in the hidden depths of the forest. This
time the king and her other male relatives followed her and said
to her, "Ugly little daughter-in-law, take us with you and show us
your god." But the temple of Shiva was ever so far from the king's
palace. The ugly daughter-in-law did not mind, for she was used to
cruel treatment. She had also walked to the temple twice before, and
her feet had got as hard as two little stones. But the king and his
relatives were tired to death; and their feet swelled up to the size
of an elephant's, and they became as full of thorns as the back of a
porcupine. And they muttered to each other, "How on earth does that
ugly little daughter-in-law manage to walk as she does through the
heart of the forest?" The ugly daughter-in-law at last felt sorry for
them. She prayed to the god Shiva to build a temple near at hand. The
god consented, and, with the help of the serpent-maidens of Patala
and of the wood-nymphs, he created suddenly a beautiful temple all of
pure, yellow gold. Its pillars were studded with jewels, and the jars
in it were all of crystal. In the middle there rose from the ground
an altar to the god Shiva. And last of all the god revealed himself
to the king and his companions in all his glory and splendour. For
a moment only they saw him; and then he vanished. The king and his
companions stared, too astonished to move or speak. But the ugly
little daughter-in-law prostrated herself and offered to the god
flowers and incense. Then she cried out, "O God Shiva, please, please
vouchsafe my prayer and make my father-in-law and my mother-in-law,
my brothers-in-law and my sisters-in-law like me as much as they now
dislike me." When the king heard her prayer his heart softened to her,
and he spoke kindly to her and gave her jewelry and trinkets. In a
little while he took off his turban and, placing it on a peg, walked
out to look at a lovely lake which, unnoticed by any one before,
now stretched out close by the temple. And behind him strolled out
his companions. But when they had gone out of sight, the beautiful
golden temple by the lake vanished for ever. After looking at the
lake the king came back to fetch his turban which he had left in
the temple. But he could not find the beautiful temple all of pure,
yellow gold, with its jewel-studded pillars and its crystal jars. The
king asked the little daughter-in-law the cause. She said nothing,
but straightway walked deeper into the forest. And the king and his
companions, although weary to death, followed her. At last they came to
the temple where she had worshipped, together with the serpent-maidens
from Patala and the bevy of wood-nymphs. It was a tiny temple,
and inside it there was a rough altar. At the foot of the altar lay
the flowers which the ugly daughter-in-law had offered to the god,
and close by on a peg hung the turban left by the king. Again the
king asked his daughter-in-law the meaning of what had happened. She
replied, "This temple that you see is my own poor little temple. But,
because of my prayers, the god Shiva showed himself to you in the
beautiful temple, all of pure, yellow gold, with its jewel-studded
pillars and its crystal jars." When the king heard her reply, he grew
more pleased than ever with the daughter-in-law whom formerly he had
so disliked. And because the god had revealed himself at her prayer,
the king, to do her honour, sent for his royal palanquin and had her
carried home in state. And the ugly little daughter-in-law became out
of the four the king's favourite. And he was so much nicer to her than
he was to his other three daughters-in-law that they became as jealous
as cats. But the king and the ugly little daughter-in-law did not mind
them the least little bit. And they both lived happily ever afterwards.





Next: Clytie

Previous: The Brahman Wife And Her Seven Sons



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1792