MEMORY GEMS. One to-day is worth two to-morrows.--Franklin Whilst we are considering when we are to begin, it is often too late to act.--Quintilian By the street of by and by one arrives at the house of never.--Cervantes When... Read more of PROMPTNESS. at Difficult.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

The Crow The Cock And The Frog

from Old French Fairy Tales - Good Little Henry





Little Henry marched resolutely to the mountain which he found much more
distant than it had appeared to him. Instead of arriving in a half hour
as he had expected, he walked rapidly the whole day without reaching its
base.

About one-third of the way he saw a Crow which was caught by the claw in
a snare which some wicked boy had set for him. The poor Crow sought in
vain to release himself from this trap which caused him cruel
sufferings. Henry ran to him, cut the cord which bound him and set him
at liberty. The poor Crow flew off rapidly, after having said to Henry,

"Thanks, my brave Henry, I will see you again."

Henry was much surprised to hear the Crow speak but he did not relax his
speed.

Some time afterwards while he was resting in a grove and eating a morsel
of bread, he saw a Cock followed by a fox and about to be taken by him
in spite of his efforts to escape. The poor frightened Cock passed very
near to Henry, who seized it adroitly, and hid it under his coat without
the fox having seen him. The fox continued his pursuit, supposing that
the Cock was before him. Henry did not move till he was entirely out of
sight. He then released the Cock, who said to him in a low voice:

"Many thanks, my brave Henry, I will see you again."

Henry was now rested. He rose and continued his journey. When he had
advanced a considerable distance he saw a poor Frog about to be devoured
by a serpent. The Frog trembled and, paralyzed by fear, could not move.
The serpent advanced rapidly, its horrid mouth open. Henry seized a
large stone and threw it so adroitly that it entered the serpent's
throat the moment it was about to devour the Frog. The frightened Frog
leaped to a distance and cried out,

"Many thanks, brave Henry; we will meet again."

Henry, who had before heard the Crow and the Cock speak, was not now
astonished at these words of the Frog and continued to walk on rapidly.

A short time after he arrived at the foot of the mountain but he was
greatly distressed to see that a large and deep river ran at its foot,
so wide that the other side could scarcely be seen. Greatly at a loss he
paused to reflect.



"Perhaps," said he, hopefully, "I may find a bridge, or ford, or a
boat."

Henry followed the course of the river which flowed entirely around the
mountain but everywhere it was equally wide and deep and he saw neither
bridge nor boat. Poor Henry seated himself on the bank of the river,
weeping bitterly.

"Fairy Bienfaisante! Fairy Bienfaisante! come to my help," he
exclaimed. "Of what use will it be to me to know that there is a plant
at the top of the mountain which will save the life of my poor mother,
if I can never reach its summit?"

At this moment the Cock whom he had protected from the fox appeared on
the borders of the river, and said to him:

"The fairy Bienfaisante can do nothing for you. This mountain is beyond
her control. But you have saved my life and I wish to prove my
gratitude. Mount my back, Henry, and by the faith of a Cock I will take
you safe to the other side."

Henry did not hesitate. He sprang on the Cock's back, fully expecting to
fall into the water but his clothes were not even moist. The Cock
received him so adroitly on his back that he felt as secure as if he had
been on horseback. He held on firmly to the crest of the Cock who now
commenced the passage.

The river was so wide that he was flying constantly twenty-one days
before he reached the other shore; but during these twenty-one days
Henry was not sleepy and felt neither hunger nor thirst.

When they arrived, Henry thanked the Cock most politely, who graciously
bristled his feathers and disappeared. A moment after this Henry turned
and to his astonishment the river was no longer to be seen.

"It was without doubt the genius of the mountain who wished to prevent
my approach," said Henry. "But, with the help of the good fairy
Bienfaisante, I think I shall yet succeed in my mission."





Next: The Harvest

Previous: The Poor Sick Mother



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 2005