Cricket Game.ca - News and Cricket Scores Visit Cricket Game.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

SQUINTY AND THE SQUIRREL

from Squinty The Comical Pig





Up, up, and up some more went Squinty, the comical pig. At first the
fast motion in the balloon made him a little dizzy, just as it might
make you feel queer the first time you went on a merry-go-'round.

"Uff! Uff!" grunted Squinty. He was so surprised at this sudden
adventure that, really, he did not know what to say.

"I wonder if he's afraid?" said one of the men.

"He acts so," the other answered. "But he'll get used to it. How high up
are you going?"

"Oh, about a mile, I guess."

Squinty cuddled down in the basket of the balloon, between two bags full
of something, and shivered.

"My goodness me!" thought poor Squinty. "A mile up in the air! That's
awfully high."

He knew about how far a mile was on land, for it was about the distance
from the farmhouse, near where his pen used to be, to the village
church. He had often heard the farmer man say so.

"And if it was a mile from my pen to the church, and that mile of road
was stood straight up in the air," thought Squinty, "it would be a
terrible long way to fall. I hope I don't fall."

And it did not seem as if he would--at least not right away. The basket
in which he was riding looked good and strong. Squinty had shut his eyes
when he heard the men speak about going a mile up in the air, but now,
as the balloon seemed to have stopped rising, the little pig opened his
eyes again, and peered all about him.

"Look!" exclaimed one of the men with a laugh. "Hasn't that pig the most
comical face you ever saw?"

"That's what he has," answered the other. "He makes me want to laugh
every time I look at him, with that funny half-shut eye of his."

"Well," thought Squinty, "I'm glad somebody is happy and jolly, and
wants to laugh, for I'm sure I don't. I wish I hadn't run away from the
nice boy who taught me the tricks."

Then, as Squinty remembered how he had been taught to stand up on his
hind legs, he thought he would do that trick now. He was hungry, and he
imagined, perhaps, if he did that trick, the men would give him
something to eat.

"Look at the little chap!" cried one of the men. "He's showing off all
right."

"Yes, he's a smart pig," said the other. "He must be a trick pig, and I
guess whoever owns him will be sorry he is lost."

"Hu! I'm sorry myself!" thought Squinty to himself, as he walked around
on his hind legs.

"I wonder if these men are ever going to give me anything to eat," he
went on. He looked at them from his queer, squinting eye, but the men
did not seem to know that the little pig was hungry.

On and on sailed the balloon, being blown by the wind like a sailboat.
Squinty dropped down on his four legs, since he found that walking on
his hind ones brought him no food. Then, as he made his way about the
basket, he saw some more of those queer bags filled with something.
There were a great many of them in the balloon, and Squinty thought they
must have something good in them.

Squinty squatted down beside one, and, with his strong teeth, he soon
had bitten a hole in the cloth. Then he took a big bite, but oh dear!

All at once he found his mouth filled with coarse sand, that gritted on
his teeth, and made the cold shivers run down his back.

"Oh, wow!" thought poor Squinty. "That's no good! Sand! I wonder if
those men eat sand?"

Of course they didn't. The sand in the bags was "ballast." The balloon
men carried it with them, and when they found the balloon coming down,
because some of the gas had leaked out of the round ball above the
basket, they would let some of the sand run out of the bags to the
ground below. This would make the balloon lighter, and it would rise
again.


"Squee! Squee! Uff! Uff!" grunted Squinty, as he wiped the sand off his
tongue on one of his legs. "I don't like that. I'm hungry."

"Why, what's the matter with the little pig?" asked one of the men,
turning around and looking at Squinty.

"He must be hungry," said the other. "See, he has bitten a hole in one
of our sand bags. Let's feed him."

"All right. Give him something to eat, but we didn't bring any pig food
along with us."

"I'll give him some bread and milk," the other man said. "We won't want
much more ourselves, for we are nearly at our last landing place."

"Squee! Squee!" squealed Squinty, when he heard this. He watched the man
put some bread and milk in a tin pan, and set it down on the floor of
the basket. Then Squinty put his nose in the dish and began to eat.

And Oh! how good it tasted! Of course the milk was sweet, instead of
sour, for men do not usually like sour milk. Squinty had a good meal,
and then he went to sleep.

What happened while Squinty slept, the little pig did not know. But when
he woke up it was all dark, and he knew it must be night, so he went to
sleep again. And the next time he awakened the sun was shining, so he
felt sure it was morning.

And then, all of a sudden, something happened. One of the men called
out:

"There is a good place to land!"

"Yes, we'll go down there," agreed the other. Then he pulled a string.
Squinty did not know what it was for, but I'll tell you. It was to open
a hole in the balloon so the gas would rush out. Then the balloon would
begin to fall.

And that is what happened. Down, down went the balloon. It went very
fast, and Squinty felt dizzy. Faster and faster fell the balloon, until,
at last it gave such a bump down on the ground that Squinty was bounced
right over the side of the basket.

Right out of the basket the comical little pig was bounced, but he came
down in a soft bed of leaves, so he was not hurt in the least. He landed
on his feet, just like a cat, and gave a loud squeal, he was so
surprised.

And then Squinty ran away. Almost anybody would have run, too, I guess,
after falling down in a balloon, and being bounced out that way. Squinty
had had enough of balloon riding.

"I don't know where I'm going, nor what will happen to me now," thought
Squinty, "but I am going to run and hide."

And run he did. He found himself in the woods; just the same kind of
woods as where he had first met the two balloon men, only, of course, it
was much farther off, for he had traveled a long way through the air.

On and on ran Squinty. All at once, in a tree over his head, he heard a
funny chattering noise.

"Chipper, chipper, chipper! Chat! Chat! Whir-r-r-r-r-!" went the noise.

Squinty looked up in the tree, and there he saw a lovely little girl
squirrel, frisking about on the branches. Then Squinty was no longer
afraid. Out of the leaves he jumped, giving a squeal and a grunt which
meant:

"Oh, how do you do? I am glad to see you. My name is Squinty. What is
your name?"

"My name is Slicko," answered the lively little girl squirrel, as she
jumped about. "Come on and play!"

Squinty felt very happy then.





Next: SQUINTY AND THE MERRY MONKEY

Previous: SQUINTY'S BALLOON RIDE



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1357