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MAPPO MEETS TUM TUM

from Good Stories For Children





Mappo did not know what a ship was, nor how it floated over the ocean
from one country to another, blown by the wind or pushed by steam
engines. The little monkey could not see much except the other monkeys
in crates on the deck near him. Finally Mappo did hear a deep growl from
somewhere behind him.

"Ha!" snarled a voice. "There will be little chance to get away now! Why
didn't you let me out of my cage, monkey?"

"I--I couldn't," said Mappo, and he looked around to see the tiger close
to him. Sharp-Tooth was in his own cage and could not reach Mappo. For
this the monkey was very glad.

All the black men who had carried the wild animals through the jungle
had gone now. In their places were white men, quite different. Mappo did
not know which he liked better, but the white men seemed to be kind, for
some of them brought food and water to the animals.

"Are we on the ship, or water-house, now?" asked Mappo, as he felt as
though he were being moved along.

"Yes, we are on a ship, and we'll never see the jungle any more," said
the tiger. "Oh wow!" and he roared very loudly.

"Quiet there!" called one of the white men, and he banged with his stick
on the tiger's cage. The tiger growled, and lay down.

Now it was quiet aboard the ship, which soon started away from the
shores of the hot, jungle country toward another land, where it is warm
part of the time and cold part of the time. Mappo was on his way to have
many new adventures.

For several days the little monkey boy did nothing but stay in his cage,
crouched in one corner, looking out between the slats. He could see
nothing, for, all around him, were other cages. But when he looked up,
through the top of his cage, he could see a little bit of blue sky.

It was the same kind of blue sky he had looked at from his tree-house in
the jungle, now so far away, and Mappo did not feel so lonesome, or
homesick, when he watched the white clouds sail over the little patch of
blue sky.

For you know animals do get homesick just as do boys and girls. Often,
in circuses and menageries, the animals become so homesick, and long so
for the land from which they have been taken, that they become ill and
die. When a keeper sees one of his pet animals getting homesick, he
tries to cure him.

He may put the homesick animal into another cage, or give him different
things to eat--things he had in his own country. Or the keeper may put
the homesick animal in with some different and new beasts, so the
homesick one may have something new to think about. Monkeys very often
become homesick, but so do elephants, tigers and lions. It is a sad
thing to be homesick, even for animals.

But Mappo was not very homesick. In the first place he was not a very
old monkey, and he had not lived in the jungle very long, though he had
been there all his life. Then, too, he was anxious to have some
adventures.

So, though when he looked at the bit of blue sky, and thought of his
home in the deep, green woods, he had a wish, only for a moment, to go
back there. He had enough to eat on the ship, plenty of cool water to
drink, and he knew he was in no danger from the tiger or other wild
beasts bigger than himself. For the tiger was fastened up in a big
strong cage, and could not get out.

Mappo, on board the ship, chattered and talked with the other monkeys in
cages all around him. He asked how they had been caught, and they told
him it was in the same way as he had been--by picking up good things to
eat on the ground, and so being tangled up in a net.

"And I don't know what is going to happen to me now," said a little girl
monkey, with a very sad face.

"Oh, cheer up!" cried Mappo, in his most jolly voice. "I am sure
something nice will happen to all of us. See, we are having a nice ride
in the water-house, and we have all we want to eat, without having to
hunt for it in the woods."

"Yes, but I want my papa and mamma!" cried the little girl monkey.

Mappo tried to make her feel happier, but it was hard work. As for
Mappo, himself, he was feeling pretty jolly, but then he was always a
merry monkey.

As the ship sailed on, over the ocean, it left behind the warm, jungle
country where Mappo had always lived. The weather grew more cool, and
though Polar Bears like cold weather, and are happy when they have a
cake of ice to sit on, monkeys do not. Monkeys must be kept very warm,
or they catch cold, just as boys and girls do.

So, as the ship sailed farther and farther north, on its way to a new
country, Mappo felt the change. Though he was covered with thick hair,
or fur, he could not help shivering, especially at night when the sun
had gone down.

The man in charge of the wild animals that were to go to the circus knew
how to look after them. He knew which ones had to be kept warm, and
which ones cold.

"You must cover up the monkeys' cages these nights," said the man to a
sailor one afternoon, as he saw Mappo and the others shivering. "Keep
them warm."

"Aye, aye, sir," answered the sailor, which was his way of saying,
"Yes, sir!"

Heavy coverings were spread over the monkeys' cages every night, but
even then Mappo shivered, and so did the others. It was quite different
from the warm jungle where he could sleep out of doors with only his own
fur for a bedquilt.

"I guess we'll have to move the monkeys down below, if it gets much
colder," said the animal man to the sailor. "They'll freeze up here."

"Free-e-e-e-eze! I-I-I-I--I g-g-g-g-guess we will!" chattered Mappo, and
he shivered so that he stuttered when he talked. Of course he spoke
monkey language, and the men could not understand him. But they could
understand his shivering, and soon they began to move the cages to a
warmer place.

Mappo and the other animals who need to be kept warm were lowered
through a hole down inside the ship. It was in a place called a "hold."
And it was called that, I suppose, because it was made to hold the cargo
of wild animals carried by the ship.

Mappo did not like it so well down in this part of the ship as he had
liked it on deck. But it was warmer, and that was a great deal. Still he
could not see the little patch of blue sky that had reminded him of his
jungle home.

"I wonder what has become of Sharp-Tooth, the big tiger?" asked Mappo,
of one of the other monkeys.

"Oh, I saw them lower his cage down into another part of the ship," said
a big monkey. "I am glad of it, too, for I don't like him so near us. He
might break out some night, and bite us."

"He wanted me to let him out," said Mappo.

"Gracious! I hope you didn't think of such a thing!" cried a little girl
monkey.

"No, I didn't," Mappo said.

"How did you happen to know the tiger?" asked the big monkey.

"Oh, he tried to get me once," Mappo answered, "and I threw an empty
cocoanut shell in his face!"

"You did!" cried all the other monkeys.

"How brave you were!" said the little girl monkey.

Mappo was beginning to feel that way himself!

For several days nothing much happened to Mappo, after he and his monkey
friends had been moved to the warm part of the ship. They had things to
eat, and water to drink, and they slept a good deal of the time. One day
the sailor who always fed Mappo stood in front of the cage, and, looking
in, said:

"I wonder if you'd bite me if I petted you a bit? You look like a nice
chap, and I like monkeys. I wonder if I couldn't teach you some tricks.
Then you'd be worth more to the circus. You'll have to learn tricks in
the circus, anyhow, and you might as well begin now. I think I'll pet
you a bit."

"Chatter! Chatter! Chat! Bur-r-r-r! Snip!" went Mappo. That meant, in
his language, that he would not think of biting the kind sailor who had
fed and watered him. But the sailor was careful. Very slowly he put out
his hand, and, reaching through the bars, he stroked Mappo's soft fur.

"That's a good chap!" said the sailor. "I believe you are going to be
nice after all."

"Bur-r-r-r! Wopp!" said Mappo. That meant: "Of course I am!"

In a few days the sailor and Mappo were good friends, and one afternoon
the sailor opened the cage door and let the monkey out. Then Mappo grew
quite excited. It was the first time he had been loose since he had been
caught, and he was so glad to run about, and use his legs and tail,
that, before he knew what he was doing, he had jumped right over the
sailor's head, and had scrambled up on the ship's deck.

"Oh, a monkey's loose! One of the monkeys has gotten away!" cried the
sailors.

"Never mind! I'll catch him!" said the one who had been kind to Mappo.

Mappo ran and leaped. He saw something like a tall tree, only it had no
branches on it. But there were ropes and ladders fast to it, and, in an
instant, Mappo had scrambled up them to the top of the tall thing. It
was the mast of the ship, but Mappo did not know that.

Away up to the top he went, and, curling his tail around a rope, there
he sat.

"Make him come down!" cried the captain. "I can't have a monkey on top
of my ship's mast! Somebody climb up after him and bring him down."

"I'll go," said a sailor.

Now a sailor is a good climber, but not nearly so good as a monkey.
Mappo waited until the sailor was almost up to him, and then, quick as a
flash, Mappo swung himself out of the way by another rope, and, just as
he had done in the jungle, he went over to the top of another mast.

"There he goes!" cried the sailors on deck.

"Yes, I see he does," said the sailor who had tried to catch Mappo.

"You had better come down," spoke the man who had let Mappo out of the
cage. "I think he'll come down for me." In his hand he held some lumps
of sugar, of which Mappo was very fond.

"Come on down, old chap," called the sailor. "No one will hurt you. Come
and get the sugar."

Now whether Mappo had had enough of being loose, or whether it was too
cold for him up on the mast, I can't say. Perhaps he wanted the sugar,
and, again, he might not have wanted to make trouble for his kind
friend, the sailor, who had let him out.

Anyhow, Mappo came slowly down, and took some of the sugar from the
sailor's hand. The sailor took hold of the collar around Mappo's
neck.



"Now lock up that monkey!" cried the captain. "And if he runs away
again, we'll whip him."

"No, it was my fault," the sailor said. "And I'd like him to be loose.
I can teach him some tricks."

"All right, do as you like," the captain spoke. "Only keep him off the
mast."

"I'm not going up there again," thought Mappo to himself. "It is too
cold."

"Come along," said the sailor, giving him another lump of sugar, and
Mappo put one hairy little paw in the hand of the sailor, and walked
along the deck with him.

"I guess you were just scared, old fellow," the man said to the monkey.
"When you get quieted down, you and I shall have lots of fun. You are
almost as nice as my elephant, Tum Tum."

This was the first Mappo had heard of the elephant. He knew what they
were, for he had often seen the big creatures in the jungle, crashing
their way through the trees, even pulling some up by the roots, in their
strong trunks, to eat the tender green tops of the trees.

"I didn't know there was an elephant on this ship," thought Mappo. But
he was soon to find out there was.

Two or three days after this Mappo was let out of his cage once more.
This time he did not jump and run. He stayed quietly beside the sailor,
and put his paw into the man's hand.

"That's the way to do it," said the sailor. "Come now, we'll go below
and see Tum Tum."

Down into a deep part of the ship, near the bottom, the sailor took
Mappo. Then the monkey could see a number of elephants chained to the
walls. They were swaying their big bodies to and fro, and swinging their
trunks. The sailor went up to the biggest elephant of them all, and, so
Mappo thought, the most jolly-looking, and said:

"Tum Tum, I have brought some one to see you. Here is a little monkey."

Mappo looked up, and saw a jolly twinkle in the little eyes of Tum Tum.
Mappo knew elephants were never unkind to monkeys, and, a moment later,
Mappo had given a jump, up to the shoulder of the sailor, and then right
on the back of Tum Tum.





Next: MAPPO IN THE CIRCUS

Previous: MAPPO ON THE SHIP



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