VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.childrenstories.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Stories - Categories - Books - Search

Featured Stories

The Little Robber Girl
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Categories

A FAIRY-TALE

Aesop

ALPHABET RHYMES

AMERICAN INDIAN STORIES

AMUSING ALPHABETS

Animal Sketches And Stories

ANIMAL STORIES

ARBOR DAY

BIRD DAY

Blondine Bonne Biche and Beau Minon

Bohemian Story

BRER RABBIT and HIS NEIGHBORS

CATS

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

CHRISTMAS DAY

COLUMBUS DAY

CUSTOM RHYMES

Didactic Stories

Everyday Verses

EVIL SPIRITS

FABLES

FABLES FOR CHILDREN

FABLES FROM INDIA

FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

For Classes Ii. And Iii.

For Classes Iv. And V.

For Kindergarten And Class I.

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

GERMAN

Good Little Henry

HALLOWEEN

Happy Days

INDEPENDENCE DAY

JAPANESE AND OTHER ORIENTAL TALES]

Jean De La Fontaine

King Alexander's Adventures

KINGS AND WARRIORS

LABOR DAY

LAND AND WATER FAIRIES

Lessons From Nature

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY

LITTLE STORIES that GROW BIG

Love Lyrics

Lyrics

MAY DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Modern

MODERN FABLES

MODERN FAIRY TALES

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

MOTHERS' DAY

Myths And Legends

NATURE SONGS

NEGLECT THE FIRE

NUMBER RHYMES

NURSERY GAMES

NURSERY-SONGS.

NURSEY STORIES

OLD-FASHIONED STORIES

ON POPULAR EDUCATION

OURSON

Perseus

PLACES AND FAMILIES

Poems Of Nature

Polish Story

Popular

PROVERB RHYMES

RESURRECTION DAY (EASTER)

RHYMES CONCERNING "MOTHER"

RIDDLE RHYMES

RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE

ROMANCES OF THE MIDDLE AGES

SAINT VALENTINE'S DAY

Selections From The Bible

Servian Story

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

Some Children's Poets

Songs Of Life

STORIES BY FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

STORIES for LITTLE BOYS

STORIES FROM BOTANY

STORIES FROM GREAT BRITAIN

STORIES FROM IRELAND

STORIES FROM PHYSICS

STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA

STORIES FROM ZOOLOGY

STORIES _for_ LITTLE GIRLS

SUPERSITITIONS

THANKSGIVING DAY

The Argonauts

THE CANDLE

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THE DECEMBRISTS

The King Of The Golden River; Or, The Black Brothers

The Little Grey Mouse

THE OLD FAIRY TALES

The Princess Rosette

THE THREE HERMITS

THE TWO OLD MEN

Theseus

Traditional

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

VERSES ABOUT FAIRIES

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

WHAT MEN LIVE BY

WHERE LOVE IS, THERE GOD IS ALSO

Ball-divination

from Popular Rhymes And Nursery Tales - SUPERSITITIONS





Cook a ball, cherry-tree;
Good ball, tell me
How many years I shall be
Before my true love I do see?
One and two, and that makes three;
Thank'ee, good ball for telling of me.

Cook is to toss, or throw, a provincialism common in the Midland
counties. The ball is thrown against a wall, and the divination is
taken from the number of rebounds it makes. Another version is--

Cuckoo, cherry-tree,[47]
Good ball, tell me
How many years I shall be
Before I get married?

[Footnote 47: The following lines reached me
without an explanation. They seem to be analogous
to the above:

Cuckoo, cherry-tree,
Lay an egg, give it me;
Lay another,
Give it my brother!]

And this is probably correct, for we appear to have formed this method
of divination in some indirect manner from a custom still prevalent in
Germany of addressing the cuckoo, when he is first heard, with a view of
ascertaining the duration of life, by counting the number of times it
repeats its note. The lines used on this occasion are given by Grimm:

Kukuk, Beckerknecht!
Sag mir recht,
Wie viel jahr Ich leben soll?

An old story is told of a man who was on his road towards a monastery,
which he was desirous of entering as a monk for the salvation of his
soul, and hearing the cuckoo, stopped to count the number of notes. They
were twenty-two. "Oh!" said he, "since I shall be sure to live
twenty-two years, what is the use of mortifying myself in a monastery
all that time? I'll e'en go and live merrily for twenty years, and it
will be all in good time to betake me to a monastery for the other two."
See Wright's Essays, i. 257; and Latin Stories, p. 42, de cuculo; p. 74,
de muliere in extremis quae dixit kuckuc. Both these tales curiously
illustrate the extent to which faith in the divination extended.

If a maid desires to attach the affections of her lover unalterably to
her, she must wait till she finds him asleep with his clothes on. She
must then take away one of his garters without his perceiving it, and
tie it to her own in a true-love knot, saying--

Three times this knot
I tie secure;
Firm is the knot,
Firm his love endure.

In many parts of the country, it is considered extremely unlucky to give
a person anything that is sharp, as a knife, razor, &c., but the bad
fortune may be averted if the receiver gives something, however
trifling, in return, and exclaims--

If you love me as I love you,
No knife shall cut our love in two!

In counting the buttons of the waistcoat upwards, the last found
corresponding to one of the following names indicates the destiny of the
wearer:

My belief,--
A captain, a colonel, a cow-boy, a thief.





Next: The Even-ash

Previous: Kale



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Viewed: 1252